Manchester Housing Authority begins $2.7 million energy efficiency and solar PV project

Project includes one of the first and largest ground mounted solar-PV systems at a state housing authority

 

Manchester, CT (June 26, 2017) – The Housing Authority of the Town of Manchester announces the completion of a 125 kW ground mount solar photovoltaic (PV) system that produces electricity from the sun at Westhill Garden apartments. This is part of a $2.7 million project that improves the energy efficiency and reduces utility costs for 275 units of the Housing Authority’s affordable senior housing portfolio.  

Manchester Housing Authority was established in 1958 and includes 455 total housing units across four sites.

This solar PV system is the largest ground mounted system serving a housing authority in the state of Connecticut, and among the first at a state housing authority. The electricity generated will serve 199 of the complex’s apartments, as well as the housing authority office. The system is expected to produce energy savings of approximately $25,000 per year and provide additional revenue to the Housing Authority under a long-term Zero Emission Renewable Energy Credit (ZREC) contract between the Housing Authority and Eversource, which should generate approximately $12,800 annually for 15 years.

Under an Energy Performance Contract (EPC) approved by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), the Building Technologies Division of Siemens Industry, Inc. installed a variety of energy conservation measures for this project, including heating systems upgrades; heat source conversions (from electric to gas); water-conservation measures (such as low flow showerheads and faucet aerators); and electrical upgrades such as LED lighting. The HUD EPC program provides incentives to public housing authorities across the country to implement energy and water savings improvements to their housing units. By leveraging energy performance contracting, this cost-effective solution pays for infrastructure upgrades with guaranteed energy savings over time.

The entire $2.7 million energy upgrade project was funded with private capital using bonds arranged by the boutique investment bank Crews & Associates, including $1.3 million from the Housing Development Fund (HDF), a Stamford-based Community Development Financial Institution. HDF’s funds for the project came from a program related investment funded by the MacArthur Foundation and secured by the Connecticut Green Bank.